Category: equipment

How to Clean a Tanning Bed

Cleaning A Tanning Bed

A tanning bed is a major investment for your business or home and it’s important to properly maintain your machine to prevent unnecessary damage and unsanitary conditions. Tanning bed manuals, like all technical manuals may not be interesting to read, but contain specific information about your tanning bed that can be useful in extending the life of your machine. Before first use, thoroughly read your tanning bed manual and write down cleaning and maintenance recommendations. Keep track of how often your machine is used, cleaned, and maintained in a log. You should sanitize your tanning bed after each use and disinfect it daily. You should do a more in depth clean, we call a “simple clean” every three to six months, and a deep clean annually or with each lamp change. Follow these step by step instructions to properly clean your tanning bed.

Cleaning Overview

  • Sanitize after each use
  • Disinfect daily
  • Perform a “Simple Clean” every 3-6 months
  • Do a “Deep Clean” annually or at lamp change

Step by Step Daily Sanitizing and Disinfecting Instructions

These instructions are for daily cleaning and disinfecting. Read below for deeper cleaning tips.

Step 1: Use a tanning bed cleaner after each use. Do not use a cleaner with alcohol or ammonia because it could harm your acrylics (thus affecting your machine’s performance). Use a cleaner designed specifically for salons that is pH neutral.

Our Tanning Bed Cleaner Recommendations:

Step 2: To sanitize after each use, use a spray bottle and spray the entire bed. Let the cleaning solution sit for 60 seconds to allow it to work. A spray bottle is one of the most convenient ways to sanitize a tanning bed.

Step 3: To disinfect daily, spray the entire bed and let the solution sit for 10 minutes. The cleaning solution should still be wet after the 10 minutes, otherwise you did not use enough.

Step 4: Use a moistened towel and wipe down your tanning bed.

Step by Step “Simple Clean” Instructions

  1. Remove power by turning off your machine and removing the power cord from the outlet.
  2. Refer to your manual to determine where your filters are and how to access them.
  3. Remove the acrylics.
  4. Remove the lamps.
  5. Vacuum the tanning bed. Please note: to prevent the risk of shock, make sure your tanning bed is unplugged if you are disassembling it and cleaning it. We recommend using both sides of a shop vac, to blow out the dust and then to clean it.
  6. Wipe down each lamp and each acrylic as you put the bed back together.
 

Step by Step “Deep Clean” Instructions

  1. Remove power by turning off your machine and removing the power cord from the outlet.
  2. Refer to your manual to determine where your filters are and how to access them. Most lay down beds have a top cover that can be removed. For a machine with a front cover that opens or removes, there is usually a lock, screw, or latch. The bench can also be hinged open by releasing a lock on the front.
  3. Remove the acrylics.
  4. Remove the lamps.
  5. Locate the electronics and fans. The electronics or ballast tray may be located under the bed in a heavy box. There may be components behind the lamp reflectors in a standup bed. Or electronics could be under the plastic canopy cover inside the top of your tanning bed. 
  6. Vacuum or dust this area. Please note: to prevent the risk of shock, make sure your tanning bed is unplugged if you are disassembling it and cleaning it. 
  7. Vacuum the rest of the tanning bed.  We recommend using both sides of a shop vac, to blow out the dust and then to clean it.
  8. Wipe down each lamp and each acrylic as you put the bed back together.

Regular usage of tanning equipment requires regular maintenance. We are happy to help you with maintenance and cleaning services for your tanning beds. Check out our VIP program with multiple options to save money on scheduling maintenance visits and emergency tanning bed repair appointments, get priority scheduling, and more, or reach out to us to schedule an appointment. 

For more information on tanning bed maintenance read our blog Tanning Bed Maintenance & Care.

Cleaning A Tanning Bed

A tanning bed is a major investment for your business or home and it’s important to properly maintain your machine to prevent unnecessary damage and unsanitary conditions.

Tanning bed manuals, like all technical manuals may not be interesting to read, but contain specific information about your tanning bed that can be useful in extending the life of your machine. Before first use, thoroughly read your tanning bed manual and write down cleaning and maintenance recommendations. Keep track of how often your machine is used, cleaned, and maintained in a log.

You should sanitize your tanning bed after each use and disinfect it daily. You should do a more in depth clean, we call a “simple clean” every three to six months, and a deep clean annually or with each lamp change. Follow these step by step instructions to properly clean your tanning bed.

Cleaning Overview

  • Sanitize after each use
  • Disinfect daily
  • Perform a “Simple Clean” every 3-6 months
  • Do a “Deep Clean” annually or at lamp change

Step by Step Daily Sanitizing and Disinfecting Instructions

These instructions are for daily cleaning and disinfecting. Read below for deeper cleaning tips.

Step 1: Use a tanning bed cleaner after each use. Do not use a cleaner with alcohol or ammonia because it could harm your acrylics (thus affecting your machine’s performance). Use a cleaner designed specifically for salons that is pH neutral.

Our Tanning Bed Cleaner Recommendations:

Step 2: To sanitize after each use, use a spray bottle and spray the entire bed. Let the cleaning solution sit for 60 seconds to allow it to work. A spray bottle is one of the most convenient ways to sanitize a tanning bed.

Step 3: To disinfect daily, spray the entire bed and let the solution sit for 10 minutes. The cleaning solution should still be wet after the 10 minutes, otherwise you did not use enough.

Step 4: Use a moistened towel and wipe down your tanning bed.

Step by Step “Simple Clean” Instructions

  1. Remove power by turning off your machine and removing the power cord from the outlet.
  2. Refer to your manual to determine where your filters are and how to access them.
  3. Remove the acrylics.
  4. Remove the lamps.
  5. Vacuum the tanning bed. Please note: to prevent the risk of shock, make sure your tanning bed is unplugged if you are disassembling it and cleaning it. We recommend using both sides of a shop vac, to blow out the dust and then to clean it.
  6. Wipe down each lamp and each acrylic as you put the bed back together.

 

Step by Step “Deep Clean” Instructions

  1. Remove power by turning off your machine and removing the power cord from the outlet.
  2. Refer to your manual to determine where your filters are and how to access them. Most lay down beds have a top cover that can be removed. For a machine with a front cover that opens or removes, there is usually a lock, screw, or latch. The bench can also be hinged open by releasing a lock on the front.
  3. Remove the acrylics.
  4. Remove the lamps.
  5. Locate the electronics and fans. The electronics or ballast tray may be located under the bed in a heavy box. There may be components behind the lamp reflectors in a standup bed. Or electronics could be under the plastic canopy cover inside the top of your tanning bed. 
  6. Vacuum or dust this area. Please note: to prevent the risk of shock, make sure your tanning bed is unplugged if you are disassembling it and cleaning it. 
  7. Vacuum the rest of the tanning bed.  We recommend using both sides of a shop vac, to blow out the dust and then to clean it.
  8. Wipe down each lamp and each acrylic as you put the bed back together.

Regular usage of tanning equipment requires regular maintenance. We are happy to help you with maintenance and cleaning services for your tanning beds. Check out our VIP program with multiple options to save money on scheduling maintenance visits and emergency tanning bed repair appointments, get priority scheduling, and more, or reach out to us to schedule an appointment. 

For more information on tanning bed maintenance read our blog Tanning Bed Maintenance & Care.

Common Types of Chiropractic Tables

There are many different types of chiropractic tables available today. Chiropractic tables vary vastly by a number of different features, including technology, portability, and how they are used for different treatments. Many are designed for specific chiropractic treatments and therapies. 

Understanding Drop Tables/Drop Segments

Chiropractic tables, including stationary, portable, elevation, and hylo tables, can all be considered “drop tables” if they include drop segments. Chiropractors use drop tables to perform the Thompson technique, also known as the drop table technique. During this treatment, the table segment is raised and pressure is applied to the patient until the table segment drops into place. Drop segments are used for treatments involving pelvic, thoracic, cervical, and abdominal. Using a drop table puts less force on the patient and is typically considered to be better on the doctor’s body as well. 

Stationary Table: A stationary table is a traditional chiropractic table, still used in many chiropractic offices today. These tables typically require less maintenance and are less expensive than the more technological counterparts. Stationary tables can come with multiple drop options for chiropractic adjustments and are typically well padded for patient comfort. 

  portable chiropractic table

Portable Table: Portable tables are similar to stationary tables but are built for portability. They can be moved and stored easily. Companies like Thuli Tables specialize in customizable portable tables and offer options like added flexion distraction. Thule recently added a new portable pediatric table to its list of products called the “Junior.”

 

Pediatric Table: A pediatric chiropractic table is designed specifically for pediatric patients, often with child-centric themes and colors. Many of these chiropractic tables are smaller versions of adult-sized chiropractic tables, designed specifically with the size of the pediatric patient in mind. 

 

elevated chiropractic tableElevation Table: An elevation table is adjustable by height. It may use a motor and simple foot switch to adjust the height of the table, or it may be manually adjusted. The benefit of an elevation table is that it requires less strain for the doctor when they are making chiropractic adjustments.

 

Hylo (Hilo or High-Low) Table: A hylo table—like an elevation table—is adjustable by height, but can also be positioned vertically. This vertical alignment can be useful for chiropractors working with patients with limited mobility. Different manufacturers may label these tables as “hilo” or “high-low.” 

Flexion Distraction Table: The flexion distraction technique is often used by chiropractors as a nonsurgical procedure to relieve pressure near the spinal region. Patients treated with this technique may have bulging discs or herniated discs, and chronic lower back pain. To perform the flexion treatment, a doctor adjusts the patient’s body by moving portions of the table. A flexion table can operate automatically or manually. Some manual tables like the Hill Laboratories Air-Flex Chiropractic Flexion Distraction Table offer additional options like air-powered drops and automatic flexion distraction. Manufacturer Thuli Tables offers the option to add flexion distraction to some of its portable tables. 

chiropractic table

Intersegmental Traction Table: Intersegmental traction is a therapy which uses a roller to stretch spinal joints to increase mobility. An intersegmental traction table may also be referred to as a roller table. These tables can be manual or automatic. Some intersegmental traction tables include a vibrating feature for massage. 

Decompression Table: Non-surgical spinal decompression therapy uses a spinal decompression table to stretch the spine, allowing spinal fluid to move back into place. This type of therapy is used for herniated or bulging discs, as well as a number of other chronic back pain conditions. These tables are typically expensive, high-end tables with advanced technological features. Some spinal decompression tables, like the HillDT Spinal Decompression Table, use sensors to detect muscle resistance and can even store patient profiles. 

   

Tips for purchasing a chiropractic table:

There are so many different types of chiropractic tables on the market today. The type of chiropractic table you choose for your business should meet your patients’ and your needs. While inexpensive options might work for your practice, a more expensive table that allows you to do more with less strain on your body might be worth the investment. Here are some things you should consider when you set out to purchase a new table for your chiropractic business: 

  1. Choose a reputable manufacturer.
  2. Make sure there is at least a one year warranty on your table.
  3. Ensure the table is comfortable for you and your patients. Many tables are designed with ergonomics in mind. Test out a table before you buy it to make sure it will work for both you and your patients. 
  4. Do your research to make sure the table will meet your patients’ needs. Do you have multiple patients with limited mobility? Do you need a machine that has flexion distraction? 
  5. Consider maintenance. Does your table require continual maintenance and upkeep? Will you need assistance with maintenance and calibration? 
  6. Shop around. Call manufacturers to ask questions and get prices. These tables are a significant investment for your business and you want to make sure it will work for you. 

All MHTT tables, new or refurbished, have a 1 year labor and parts warranty. Learn more about maintaining and repairing your table in our blog Repairing a Chiropractic Table.  

Other links Chiropractic Table Repair Services Service Plans and Pricing

There are many different types of chiropractic tables available today. Chiropractic tables vary vastly by a number of different features, including technology, portability, and how they are used for different treatments. Many are designed for specific chiropractic treatments and therapies. 


Understanding Drop Tables/Drop Segments

Chiropractic tables, including stationary, portable, elevation, and hylo tables, can all be considered “drop tables” if they include drop segments. Chiropractors use drop tables to perform the Thompson technique, also known as the drop table technique. During this treatment, the table segment is raised and pressure is applied to the patient until the table segment drops into place. Drop segments are used for treatments involving pelvic, thoracic, cervical, and abdominal. Using a drop table puts less force on the patient and is typically considered to be better on the doctor’s body as well. 

Stationary Table: A stationary table is a traditional chiropractic table, still used in many chiropractic offices today. These tables typically require less maintenance and are less expensive than the more technological counterparts. Stationary tables can come with multiple drop options for chiropractic adjustments and are typically well padded for patient comfort. 

 

portable chiropractic table

Portable Table: Portable tables are similar to stationary tables but are built for portability. They can be moved and stored easily. Companies like Thuli Tables specialize in customizable portable tables and offer options like added flexion distraction. Thule recently added a new portable pediatric table to its list of products called the “Junior.”

 

Pediatric Table: A pediatric chiropractic table is designed specifically for pediatric patients, often with child-centric themes and colors. Many of these chiropractic tables are smaller versions of adult-sized chiropractic tables, designed specifically with the size of the pediatric patient in mind. 

 

elevated chiropractic tableElevation Table: An elevation table is adjustable by height. It may use a motor and simple foot switch to adjust the height of the table, or it may be manually adjusted. The benefit of an elevation table is that it requires less strain for the doctor when they are making chiropractic adjustments.

 

Hylo (Hilo or High-Low) Table: A hylo table—like an elevation table—is adjustable by height, but can also be positioned vertically. This vertical alignment can be useful for chiropractors working with patients with limited mobility. Different manufacturers may label these tables as “hilo” or “high-low.” 

Flexion Distraction Table: The flexion distraction technique is often used by chiropractors as a nonsurgical procedure to relieve pressure near the spinal region. Patients treated with this technique may have bulging discs or herniated discs, and chronic lower back pain. To perform the flexion treatment, a doctor adjusts the patient’s body by moving portions of the table. A flexion table can operate automatically or manually. Some manual tables like the Hill Laboratories Air-Flex Chiropractic Flexion Distraction Table offer additional options like air-powered drops and automatic flexion distraction. Manufacturer Thuli Tables offers the option to add flexion distraction to some of its portable tables. 

chiropractic table

Intersegmental Traction Table: Intersegmental traction is a therapy which uses a roller to stretch spinal joints to increase mobility. An intersegmental traction table may also be referred to as a roller table. These tables can be manual or automatic. Some intersegmental traction tables include a vibrating feature for massage. 

Decompression Table: Non-surgical spinal decompression therapy uses a spinal decompression table to stretch the spine, allowing spinal fluid to move back into place. This type of therapy is used for herniated or bulging discs, as well as a number of other chronic back pain conditions. These tables are typically expensive, high-end tables with advanced technological features. Some spinal decompression tables, like the HillDT Spinal Decompression Table, use sensors to detect muscle resistance and can even store patient profiles. 

 

 

Tips for purchasing a chiropractic table:

There are so many different types of chiropractic tables on the market today. The type of chiropractic table you choose for your business should meet your patients’ and your needs. While inexpensive options might work for your practice, a more expensive table that allows you to do more with less strain on your body might be worth the investment. Here are some things you should consider when you set out to purchase a new table for your chiropractic business: 

  1. Choose a reputable manufacturer.
  2. Make sure there is at least a one year warranty on your table.
  3. Ensure the table is comfortable for you and your patients. Many tables are designed with ergonomics in mind. Test out a table before you buy it to make sure it will work for both you and your patients. 
  4. Do your research to make sure the table will meet your patients’ needs. Do you have multiple patients with limited mobility? Do you need a machine that has flexion distraction? 
  5. Consider maintenance. Does your table require continual maintenance and upkeep? Will you need assistance with maintenance and calibration? 
  6. Shop around. Call manufacturers to ask questions and get prices. These tables are a significant investment for your business and you want to make sure it will work for you. 

All MHTT tables, new or refurbished, have a 1 year labor and parts warranty. Learn more about maintaining and repairing your table in our blog Repairing a Chiropractic Table.  

Other links

Chiropractic Table Repair Services

Service Plans and Pricing

Tanning Bed Maintenance & Care

How to Maintain Your Tanning Bed

Proper maintenance and care of your tanning bed will ensure the longevity and usefulness of your machine. Whether its used for commercial or residential purposes, over time your tanning bed may need to have parts repaired or replaced. While some repairs are to be expected, it is important to keep up routine maintenance to prevent unnecessary problems. There are some things you should do to avoid costly repairs as well as preserve the lifespan of your tanning bed. Tips for Maintaining Your Tanning Bed
  1. Keep a maintenance log: A maintenance log will help you to keep track of your tanning bed’s condition. Keep track of all maintenance you do on your tanning bed, including changing tanning lamps, checking timers, fans, cords, reflectors, and wires. Set aside time monthly to inspect your machine closely. Pay close attention to its shocks, springs, and hinges. Make sure to keep track of how often bulbs or lamps are changed. Older bulbs or tanning lamps may increase the time it takes to develop a tan, which will require more energy. Tanning bed lamps and bulbs should be replaced all at once to ensure an even display of light. If only one lamp is replaced at a time this might result in a striped tan effect. Your lamp starters might also need to be replaced when you change your lamps.
  2. Routinely clean equipment: You should thoroughly wipe down your tanning bed after each usage. It is important to use a tanning bed cleaner on your tanning bed acrylics. Do not use a cleaner with alcohol or ammonia because it could harm your acrylics (thus affecting your machine’s performance). Once a week, do a more in-depth cleaning. Routinely dust and clean your machine, including the fan, reflectors, and bulbs. Clean or replace air filters. Consider vacuuming the inside of your machine once a month or two to remove excess dust or residue. Dust on bulbs or lamps could hinder the amount of UV light emitted from your tanning bed. You will need to remove the acrylics to reach the bulbs and reflectors. Don’t forget to clean your tanning bed’s ballast tray. This is the tray that holds the ballast and other electrical equipment.  Please note: to prevent the risk of shock, make sure your tanning bed is unplugged if you are disassembling it and cleaning it.
  3. Consult your manual: Your tanning bed manual will provide you with pertinent information about your specific machine and how to care for it. Consult your manual for what power source your tanning bed requires. You might need to consider having a dedicated circuit for your machine. Your manual may also instruct you on the ideal environment your machine should be in, for instance, suggesting an average room temperature. It might also include requirements for how far your tanning bed should be from the wall to provide proper airflow for fan openings. Review your manual for information on replacement parts, including replacement lamps or bulbs. Pay close attention to this, because using improper parts may void your warranty. Your manual will mostly likely provide information on troubleshooting areas, including things you can try on your own, before reaching out to a professional.
  4. Consider hiring a professional: Your tanning bed is an expensive investment. You may be able to repair or replace some parts on your own. You should call a professional if you are not sure what is wrong or how to fix it. If you’re not sure you can keep up with maintenance, consider hiring a professional to do routine or preventative maintenance. A tanning bed technician can check your machine’s functionality as well as inspect specific parts of your tanning bed.
Your tanning bed is designed for long term usage, but it is important to properly care for it to ensure it stays in good shape. Tanning bed maintenance, like cleaning, dusting, and inspecting, is not only sanitary, but necessary to ensure the life of your tanning bed. If you own a commercial tanning salon, consider consulting your manual to create a checklist for what parts should be cleaned or inspected and how often. If you have concerns about your machine’s functionality or efficacy that you do not feel are answered by your manual, reach out to a tanning bed repair technician.   Learn more about our Tanning Bed Repair Services Learn more about our Service Plans and Pricing.

How to Maintain Your Tanning Bed

Proper maintenance and care of your tanning bed will ensure the longevity and usefulness of your machine. Whether its used for commercial or residential purposes, over time your tanning bed may need to have parts repaired or replaced. While some repairs are to be expected, it is important to keep up routine maintenance to prevent unnecessary problems. There are some things you should do to avoid costly repairs as well as preserve the lifespan of your tanning bed.

Tips for Maintaining Your Tanning Bed

  1. Keep a maintenance log: A maintenance log will help you to keep track of your tanning bed’s condition. Keep track of all maintenance you do on your tanning bed, including changing tanning lamps, checking timers, fans, cords, reflectors, and wires. Set aside time monthly to inspect your machine closely. Pay close attention to its shocks, springs, and hinges. Make sure to keep track of how often bulbs or lamps are changed. Older bulbs or tanning lamps may increase the time it takes to develop a tan, which will require more energy. Tanning bed lamps and bulbs should be replaced all at once to ensure an even display of light. If only one lamp is replaced at a time this might result in a striped tan effect. Your lamp starters might also need to be replaced when you change your lamps.
  2. Routinely clean equipment: You should thoroughly wipe down your tanning bed after each usage. It is important to use a tanning bed cleaner on your tanning bed acrylics. Do not use a cleaner with alcohol or ammonia because it could harm your acrylics (thus affecting your machine’s performance). Once a week, do a more in-depth cleaning. Routinely dust and clean your machine, including the fan, reflectors, and bulbs. Clean or replace air filters. Consider vacuuming the inside of your machine once a month or two to remove excess dust or residue. Dust on bulbs or lamps could hinder the amount of UV light emitted from your tanning bed. You will need to remove the acrylics to reach the bulbs and reflectors. Don’t forget to clean your tanning bed’s ballast tray. This is the tray that holds the ballast and other electrical equipment.  Please note: to prevent the risk of shock, make sure your tanning bed is unplugged if you are disassembling it and cleaning it.
  3. Consult your manual: Your tanning bed manual will provide you with pertinent information about your specific machine and how to care for it. Consult your manual for what power source your tanning bed requires. You might need to consider having a dedicated circuit for your machine. Your manual may also instruct you on the ideal environment your machine should be in, for instance, suggesting an average room temperature. It might also include requirements for how far your tanning bed should be from the wall to provide proper airflow for fan openings. Review your manual for information on replacement parts, including replacement lamps or bulbs. Pay close attention to this, because using improper parts may void your warranty. Your manual will mostly likely provide information on troubleshooting areas, including things you can try on your own, before reaching out to a professional.
  4. Consider hiring a professional: Your tanning bed is an expensive investment. You may be able to repair or replace some parts on your own. You should call a professional if you are not sure what is wrong or how to fix it. If you’re not sure you can keep up with maintenance, consider hiring a professional to do routine or preventative maintenance. A tanning bed technician can check your machine’s functionality as well as inspect specific parts of your tanning bed.

Your tanning bed is designed for long term usage, but it is important to properly care for it to ensure it stays in good shape. Tanning bed maintenance, like cleaning, dusting, and inspecting, is not only sanitary, but necessary to ensure the life of your tanning bed. If you own a commercial tanning salon, consider consulting your manual to create a checklist for what parts should be cleaned or inspected and how often. If you have concerns about your machine’s functionality or efficacy that you do not feel are answered by your manual, reach out to a tanning bed repair technician.

 

Learn more about our Tanning Bed Repair Services

Learn more about our Service Plans and Pricing.

Repairing a Chiropractic Table

When should you call in reinforcements?

In the age of do-it-yourself blogs and YouTube tutorial videos, you might consider trying to fix your chiropractic table before hiring help, but when should you consider calling in reinforcements?

Your chiropractic table’s make and model may determine the amount of work you can do yourself and when you should call a professional. Higher-end chiropractic tables, like decompression, hylo (or hilo), flexion distraction, and elevation, are more mechanical and may require an expert from the onset.

Tune-ups Just as you would advise your patients to keep up their routine medical care, we encourage routine preventative maintenance of your chiropractic equipment. For safety reasons, you should inspect your equipment often. A skilled technician can also evaluate the health of your equipment and suggest any necessary repairs.

You may be able to handle smaller tune-ups on your own, especially if you have a standard or portable table. Inspect your table for loose screws. Pay close attention to the moving parts, like the joints and hinges, and make sure to oil them routinely. If this is something you are not comfortable with, reach out to a service provider for help.

Wear and Tear Your chiropractic table is likely the most utilized tool in your office and possibly the most visible. For these reasons, we often encourage our clients to keep up routine maintenance for their table to avoid unnecessary damage, as well as to repair the usual wear and tear. Quick fixes like lubrication or small adjustments may be all your table needs. With consistent daily usage, some parts may wear down over time and need to be replaced. This is when you should call a professional to service your table.

Consider the amount of padding and if the table is still comfortable for your patients. Over time, the cushioning may degrade and need to be replaced. The condition of the upholstery is important for not only comfort, but cleanliness as well. If there is a tear in the upholstery, you should have it repaired to prevent further damage. If you are repairing your chiropractic table’s upholstery and have thought about changing the color, this would be the time to do it!

Calibration Whether your table is new, new to you, recently moved, or has not been serviced in awhile, consider hiring a technician to inspect it and determine if it needs calibration. Many high-end and newer models of chiropractic tables were created to improve the comfort of you and your patients. They are also more complicated to operate and need to be checked more often for correct calibration.

Problem Areas - Know Your Table Your specific chiropractic table will come with a manual, which should include troubleshooting areas. For instance, if you have a Thuli flexion table and notice the headpiece is slipping, it is likely that the table’s piston mechanism may need cleaning and lubricating. Every table is different, and it is important to consider upkeep of your equipment to extend its longevity. For many higher-end models, consider having a professional assess your equipment to ensure you do not do further damage. Also, make sure to choose to work with a company that has experience with maintaining your specific make and model.

Learn more about our Chiropractic Table Repair Services

Learn more about our Service Plans and Pricing

When should you call in reinforcements?

In the age of do-it-yourself blogs and YouTube tutorial videos, you might consider trying to fix your chiropractic table before hiring help, but when should you consider calling in reinforcements?

Your chiropractic table’s make and model may determine the amount of work you can do yourself and when you should call a professional. Higher-end chiropractic tables, like decompression, hylo (or hilo), flexion distraction, and elevation, are more mechanical and may require an expert from the onset.

Tune-ups
Just as you would advise your patients to keep up their routine medical care, we encourage routine preventative maintenance of your chiropractic equipment. For safety reasons, you should inspect your equipment often. A skilled technician can also evaluate the health of your equipment and suggest any necessary repairs.

You may be able to handle smaller tune-ups on your own, especially if you have a standard or portable table. Inspect your table for loose screws. Pay close attention to the moving parts, like the joints and hinges, and make sure to oil them routinely. If this is something you are not comfortable with, reach out to a service provider for help.

Wear and Tear
Your chiropractic table is likely the most utilized tool in your office and possibly the most visible. For these reasons, we often encourage our clients to keep up routine maintenance for their table to avoid unnecessary damage, as well as to repair the usual wear and tear. Quick fixes like lubrication or small adjustments may be all your table needs. With consistent daily usage, some parts may wear down over time and need to be replaced. This is when you should call a professional to service your table.

Consider the amount of padding and if the table is still comfortable for your patients. Over time, the cushioning may degrade and need to be replaced. The condition of the upholstery is important for not only comfort, but cleanliness as well. If there is a tear in the upholstery, you should have it repaired to prevent further damage. If you are repairing your chiropractic table’s upholstery and have thought about changing the color, this would be the time to do it!

Calibration
Whether your table is new, new to you, recently moved, or has not been serviced in awhile, consider hiring a technician to inspect it and determine if it needs calibration. Many high-end and newer models of chiropractic tables were created to improve the comfort of you and your patients. They are also more complicated to operate and need to be checked more often for correct calibration.

Problem Areas – Know Your Table
Your specific chiropractic table will come with a manual, which should include troubleshooting areas. For instance, if you have a Thuli flexion table and notice the headpiece is slipping, it is likely that the table’s piston mechanism may need cleaning and lubricating. Every table is different, and it is important to consider upkeep of your equipment to extend its longevity. For many higher-end models, consider having a professional assess your equipment to ensure you do not do further damage. Also, make sure to choose to work with a company that has experience with maintaining your specific make and model.

Learn more about our Chiropractic Table Repair Services

Learn more about our Service Plans and Pricing